“SEW EASY” FLEECE NECK WARMERS

   

  Feeling a little chilly around the neck this time of year? An odd question, maybe, but not quite so out of the ordinary — especially in Minnesota, where I live, and where we have to be conquerors of bitter winds and snow.

  Even in moderate climates, a little added warmth on a damp, cold day can feel cozy and comfy, and that’s when wearing a simple fleece neck warmer can make a difference. Save money and enjoy making easy-to-sew neck warmers for yourself, family and friends in patterns and lovely colors for a warm-up solution when heading outdoors — whether, skiing, skating or taking your dog for a walk. 

  You might include your teens in the making. If they have never used a sewing machine, it’s a good first sewing project because of the simple straight seams. Once you see how quickly these neck warmers come together, you’ll be inspired to make more for birthday presents and for guests if you host an outdoor winter party.

  Kids of all ages might enjoy helping you choose colors and patterns of fleece online and at your local fabric store. For best results, use the heaviest type of fleece. (Stores such as JoAnn offer coupons regularly for significant discounts on your purchase. My neck warmers came to less than $2 each using the heaviest “Luxe” variety.)

  I homed in on patterns and plaids, but solids are also a good choice and a great look with sweaters and winter jackets. Plus, the straight lines of plaids and checks provide a visual guide when measuring and cutting, a timesaver when cutting out several neck warmers.

 

Here’s what you’ll need for four teen- and adult-size neck warmers:

  — tissue paper or plain large sheet of paper for making pattern

  — straight pins 

  — 2/3 yard of 56- to 60-inch-wide heavyweight fleece fabric

  — good sewing scissors

  Here’s the fun:

  1. Make a pattern. Measure and cut the paper 10 1/2 inches x 21 inches.

  2. Pin pattern to single layer of fabric making sure the short side of the pattern is placed parallel to, but not on, the selvage. This way, fabric should stretch along its longer side. Setting the pattern this direction ensures that the neck warmers give correctly. Cut the fabric. 

  3. Fold the rectangle in half width-wise with right sides facing. Pin and stitch, allowing for a 1/2-inch seam. 

  4. Hem both open sides. First fold over edges 1/2 inch and insert pins to hold place. Stitch with sewing machine. Remove pins.

  5. Turn neck warmer right side out. It is ready to wear. 

MAKE LOOK-ALIKE POLAR FLEECE SCARVES FOR COZY WINTER DAYS

Be warm and feel cozy with easy, no-sew polar fleece scarves. Make one for each member of the family — including your dog! — in the same plaid or pattern, and you’ll be dressed with extra family spirit for sporting events, get-togethers and taking photos.
Find washable polar fleece fabric in a variety of patterns and designs by the yard online and at fabric stores. (Stores such as Jo-Ann offer coupons regularly for significant discounts on your purchase. My scarves came to less than $2 each. Online coupons can be found here if you are looking for something similar online.)
I zoomed in on the checks and plaids, and chose classic black and red buffalo check this year — a great look for cold winter months. The straight lines of plaids and checks provide a visual guide when measuring and cutting, a timesaver when cutting out several scarves.
For school-age kids and adults, an 8-inch-by-60-inch scarf is a nice size, so count on purchasing about 1 2/3 yards for six scarves, depending on the repetition of the pattern. Since the fleece doesn’t ravel, there’s no need to allow for seams.
Here’s what you’ll need for six medium-size scarves:
–1 2/3 yards of 59-60-inch-wide polar fleece fabric
–good sewing scissors or rotary cutter (adults only) and rotary cutting mat
–a clear plastic ruler such as a quilter’s ruler
–straight pins or fabric pencil if using scissors
Here’s the fun:
1. Lay out the fabric on your worktable and rotary cutting mat, if using rotary cutter. Measure and mark the length (60 inches) and width (8 inches) points of your scarves with straight pins or fabric pencil. The scarf length should be along the selvage (not across the width of the fabric), so that the scarves won’t stretch out of shape. For a uniform look, be mindful of repeat checks or plaids as you measure. Adjust measurements if making scarves for small children or your pet.
2. Cut off the selvages, and then cut out scarves.
3. Cut fringe 1/2 inch by 4 inches on each end for a fun, finished look.
Extra idea: For a unique and useful memento, make matching scarves for guests at your next birthday or sledding party.